Brainpower

Curious App

curious1curious-iconThe Curious App combines life-long learning with personalised learning. Thus aiming at adults. You get a daily learning workout with facts and information presented through texts, videos, pictures, stories etc. Before you start, your profile is created based on what interests you, on what you wish to learn and on how much time you wish to spend daily.

You can try out the App 7 days for free, thereafter you have to pay. This gives you a good idea about what to expect when you buy the App for use during a longer period. It is claimed that with the daily workouts, you grow your CQ, Curiosity Quotient. Curious is supported by Prof. Carol Dweck known for research on the importance of a Growth Mindset for success in learning.

The Curious App reminded me of the Who, What, Why books I read as a child. Facts and information on whatever topic you can think of.

Curious areas of interest

Curious areas of interest

 Purchase  $ 9.99 (a months !)
 Hardware  iPhone, iPad
 Requirements  iOS 9.0 or higher
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Concept Cartoons-3

Every month DiScoro writes about (digital) resources that can be used in schools. In addition you will find issues that may inspire you. See Services for workshops, training etc.

Two more concept cartoons that can be used in class. Use pictures of characters with the speech balloons that fit your situation . See also earlier posts Concept Cartoons and Concept Cartoons-2. Many Brainpower problems can also be introduced with the Concept Cartoon format.

I discussed the first problem with grade 5 and grade 6 pupils. The were perfectly able to reason what would happen, even though they we never instructed on Archimedes’ Law. You can also use the concept cartoon in grade 8 or 9 after students have learned about Archimedes’ Law. Do not be disappointed if the students are confused.

Problem: We take a glass basin and place a plastic net with marbles and korks in it. We make sure that the net with the marbles and korks floats in the water. There is nothing that sticks out above the water and the net does not toach the bottom of the basin.

You can also bring the materials in class and let pupils fill the net so that it floats in the water. Discuss and finally cut the net. The answer requires reasoning about why this happens, but there are so many factors that these should come from the students and do not fit into the speech clouds.

What will happen to the water level if we cut the net open?

concepts-cartoons-waterniveau

The second concept cartoon is suitable for a younger age group (grade 2 or 3).

How can you go down faster on your sledge?
sledge

During the discussion words and concepts like speed, acceleration, friction (both with the surface as well as air friction), weight, size may be used.

Lazors game

lazors-iconLazors is an interesting App about principles in physics such as light beams and how they are reflected, bent, or broken by different materials. As a player you have discover for yourself what the aim is and how to reach it. There are many different levels.

Students can be asked to explain the game and about their reasoning in solving the problems. Thereby, the teacher can introduce vocabulary like: light wave, straight line, ray, beam, reflection of light, refraction of light (bending of light), breaking light, prism, angle of refraction, angle of reflection, mirror, glass, crystal.

A  pre-designed page on Smart Notebook can help to discuss the principles and reasoning.

Practical applications:

  • Stick a straw in a half filled glass of water and observe the refraction of light. This visual distortion occurs at the water-air boundary.
  • The same phenomenon protects fish from a hunter who is spearfishing from the shore. Due to this bending of the path of light, a fish appears to be at a location where it isn’t. The hunter launches the spear at the location where the fish is thought to be, but isn’t, and misses the fish.
  • How big needs a mirror be for you to be able to see yourself from top to toe (while standing)?

The game can be used from age 10 onwards.

 Purchase  Free
 Hardware  iPad, iPhone, (PC)
 Requirements  IOS, Android/Google Play

Concept Cartoons-2

Every month DiScoro writes about (digital) resources that can be used in schools. In addition you will find issues that may inspire you. See Services for workshops, training etc.

The blogpost Concept Cartoons is so popular that we decided to write a second blogpost on the subject. The advantage of using Concept Cartoons in class is that it does not require material and a great deal of organisation that comes along with practical, hands-on experiments in class. However, hands-on practicals can be part of it, and remain a valuable and essential part of science education.

Two examples of concept cartoons. If you design your own concept cartoons it is recommended to leave one character with an empty speech balloon.

concept-snowman2

 

 

For more information see the official Concept Cartoons website.

concept-blood-circulation2

 

If you design your own concept cartoons it is recommended to leave one character with an empty speech balloon. Try out the following cartoon. We have started the first question already.
An effervescent tablet has been dropped in (warm) water.

Click on the picture to enlarge.

Concept Cartoons

concept ice in waterConcept Cartoon is a relatively new approach to teaching, learning and assessment in science. Concept Cartoons were first developed and created by Brenda Keogh and Stuart Naylor in 1991. Concept Cartoons feature cartoon-style drawings showing different characters arguing about an everyday situation. They are designed to intrigue, to provoke to encourage discussion, and to stimulate scientific thinking. The problems or questions posed may not have a single “right answer”.

The characters in the Concept Cartoons offer the students a role model they can identify with. This encourages students to choose a character and thus discuss freely. It does not become too personal what the student expresses about the concept. The cartoons can be used with pupils from 6 to 14.

Concept Cartoons can be an introduction to a more practical and hands-on experiment, a summary after experimenting, or just a discussion in class.

concept cave dark light

More on Concept Cartoons-2 and Concept Cartoons_3.

Brainpower: Facebook friends

Every month DiScoro writes about resources that can be used in schools or about inspirational issues. See Services in the Menu for workshops, training etc.

Archimedes is  a task in a series of Brainpower questions and tasks. See also Brainpower: Milk packaging and ArchimedesThis type of questions and tasks require higher order thinking skillsmeaning that students have to apply several types of knowledge and skills. Higher order thinking skills involve critical thinking, problem solving, research, argumentation, discussion, evaluation, collaboration, judgement etc. The questions and tasks require brainpower and often several different strategies can lead to the solution.

We give you examples that you can use in the classroom. We appreciate your comments which you can write in as a comment. With your comments we are able to improve the tasks and the information about them.

facebookfriends

Brainpower tasks require a different attitude and behaviour from both teacher and students. As a teacher you guide the students without disclosing answers, strategies or algorithms. You will rather guide the students with questions that encourage them to think in different ways, which help them to discuss further, or to visualise the problem in a creative way. Usually, students work on a task in small groups and for quite a while.

Download the PDF for the teacher: Facebookfriends.pdf

Brainpower tasks require a different attitude and behaviour from both teacher and students. As a teacher you guide the students without disclosing answers, strategies or algorithms. You will rather guide the students with questions that encourage them to think in different ways, which help them to discuss further, or to visualise the problem in a creative way. Usually, students work on a task in small groups and for quite a while.

 

Brainpower: Archimedes

Archimedes is  a task in a series of Brainpower questions and tasks. See also Project: Milk packagingThis type of questions and tasks require higher order thinking skills, meaning that students have to apply several types of knowledge and skills. Higher order thinking skills involve critical thinking, problem solving, research, argumentation, discussion, evaluation, collaboration, judgement etc. The questions and tasks require brainpower and often several different strategies can lead to the solution.

We give you examples that you can use in the classroom. We appreciate your comments which you can write in as a comment. With your comments we are able to improve the tasks and the information about them.

Brainpower Task: Crowns

Crowns task

Topic: Archimedes
Subject area: Science/Physics
Level : grade  8, 9 (?)

Download the PDF with the task: Archimedes

Download the PDF with guidelines for the teacher: Guidelines Archimedes

Brainpower tasks require a different attitude and behaviour from both teacher and students. As a teacher you guide the students without disclosing answers, strategies or algorithms. You will rather guide the students with questions that encourage them to think in different ways, which help them to discuss further, or to visualise the problem in a creative way. Usually, students work on a task in small groups and for quite a while.