Untangle

untangle-iconThe game we discuss here is (also) called Lazors, but a more suitable name could be Untangle or Network Points. This game is a typical example of a game that allows for ‘low floor – high ceiling’ activities. It is easy to start, yet very complex questions can be asked about the graphs.

Mathematical knowledge and skills that lie in the game are:

  1. spatial awareness
  2. geometry
  3. graph theory (topological characteristics of graphs).

The first task is to find out what the aim is. Don’t tell the students, but ask them to find it out and describe it. Perhaps write an instruction or guideline for a user.

After solving many levels students can think of new questions such as the ones below.

lazorsm5

 

How many different solutions are there?

 

 

 

lazorsm6

Is it possible to move all the triangles (and squares) to the outside so that no triangle lies within another triangle/square? When is this possible and when not?

Can you make a network that cannot be untangled in the way this game requires? If yes, how do you design such a network? What are it’s characteristics.

Can you predict whether a network can be untangled or not without trying it out. Evidence, proof!

The program GeoGebra can be used to draw the networks and discuss the reasoning and show the different options.

The game is suitable from primary school up to university level.

 Purchase  Free
 Hardware  PC, iPad, tablet
 Requirements  browser
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s